Heavyweight George Freeman fails to land knockout punch after giving May a good grilling

Tory Policy Advisor and former heavyweight boxer George Freeman has resigned. This latest blow has left Theresa May punch-drunk but somehow still standing.

Freeman, who also moonlights as a grill salesman, is jumping out of the frying pan and into the fire of reforming the Conservative Party. This story has been simmering away for some time, before boiling over earlier this week.

He recently issued a stark warning to May’s government that Brexit risked turning the UK into an old folks’ home that can’t pay for itself. In other words, after Brexit the country could well be a bit like the House of Lords.

It is natural to conclude that Freeman’s resignation means that his warning was ignored. With so much at stake (medium rare, with onions), anyone predicting burnt offerings is being frozen out.

Freeman has, in the past, warned that the Conservatives are failing to attract the younger generation. To this end he organised ‘GlastonTory’ which was every bit as successful as it sounds. Young people are now flocking to ignore the Tories.

One barrier to youth appeal must be the Young Conservatives. It is rumoured that, in order to join the YC, you must undergo an initiation ceremony. Among the alleged required rituals, you must burn money in front of homeless people, and perform unspeakable acts upon a pig’s head.

Freeman’s constituents seem unconcerned. Typical opinions coming out of Mid Norfolk can be roughly sorted into three categories. Firstly, it’s OK, he still has the grill business on the side. Secondly, a muttered “It’s normal for Mid Norfolk”. And finally, who the dickens is George Freeman?

May has now received so many blows to the head that there is a real danger of brain damage and dementia. If only she could afford to pay the fees at the old folks’ home…

The government is planning to introduce pay-per-vote in time for the next election

The success of pay-per-view for sporting events, and pay-as-you-go for mobile phones, has prompted the latest government initiative. Pay-per-vote is being made available to anybody who only engages in democracy on an occasional basis, and will be in place by the next general election.

This is also part of the austerity drive. Less than 100% of the population actually uses their vote, so there is no need to waste scarce resources on providing votes that will go to waste.

The Department of Democracy Is What We Say It Is sent spokesminion Zuffar Ghreatli to explain. “”This is a great day for democracy!”” claimed Ghreatli. “”Now people can access democracy at the point of sale. We are proud to announce that the post-Brexit UK will be the world leader in democratic processes.””

The inspiration apparently came from Margaret Thatcher introducing charges for eye tests. “”Yes, I think everyone would be happy to pay a small contribution,”” confirmed Ghreatli. “”This will ensure that people receive the best possible democracy for their money.””

Under the new system, a second opinion is available. “”In fact, you may have as many votes as you wish,”” Ghreatli explained. ““It is your right to buy as many as you require. This can only be for the good of the country.””

The opposition was not amused. ““This move removes the franchise from the poor,”” read a statement issued by the Shadow Minister for Democracy Is What We Say It Is. ““It is a blatant affront upon democracy, and we heartily reject the government’s proposals unless they threaten us again.””

The Shadow Minister himself is believed to be suffering from Tourette’’s Apoplexy, and only able to communicate in outbursts of obscenities.

“”Nonsense, our scheme opens up democracy,”” countered Ghreatli. ““If you approve of a candidate, you may now cast, four, ten or even a hundred votes to demonstrate your approval. As a bonus, subscribers are exempt from pay-per-vote, and may vote as many times as they please on production of their subscription card.””

To subscribe to democracy, simply join the Conservative Party. Subscription charges are as little as £50,000 per annum.